Transmissible Gastroenteritis in Pigs (TGE)

Transmissible gasteroenteritis virus (TGEV, = Suid corona virus 1)

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Changed on: 22.01.2019
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Schweine

The cause of TGE is the transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV, = Suid corona virus 1; family Coronaviridae, genus Coronavirus), which is related to the virus for the feline infectious peritonitis (FIP). TGE was first described in 1946. Since then, it has been found in many countries that have notable pig production. A respiratory variant of TGEV -- the Porcine respiratory coronavirus (PRCoV) -- has been known since 1986.

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Schweine

The cause of TGE is the transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV, = Suid corona virus 1; family Coronaviridae, genus Coronavirus), which is related to the virus for the feline infectious peritonitis (FIP). TGE was first described in 1946. Since then, it has been found in many countries that have notable pig production. A respiratory variant of TGEV -- the Porcine respiratory coronavirus (PRCoV) -- has been known since 1986.

More information

Transmission

Transmission

TGEV is mainly transmitted from animal to animal, predominately via oral contact or aerogenically. There is also evidence of indirect transmission via feed containers, farm equipment and similar or iatrogenic transmission (caused by a vet).

Symptoms

Symptoms

The incubation period is usually 1-2 days maximum. Newborn piglets and weaning piglets have a particularly high mortality rate (almost 100 %) when infected. The first clinical symptoms in piglets are shaking, vomiting without stopping to wean, and thirst. These are soon followed by severe diarrhoea that has a typically foul smell. Fever is rare and for a very short period. The death of infected animals occurs within 3 to 6 days due to dehydration, loss of electrolytes and acidosis.

The severity of the disease decreases in older animals. Mortality rates are generally lower, but may be affected by stress factors such as cold, humidity or secondary bacterial infections. Lactating sows can be infected and show signs of mild fever, agalactia (lactation failure) and loss of appetite, diarrhoea and refusal to feed.

 

 

Prevention, Control

Prevention, Control

Prevent virus transmission by following strict hygiene measures on the farms and only putting completely TGEV-free animals in pens.

Detection Methods

TEGV is detected: using the IF (immunofluorescence method) for testing organ sections (jejunum, ileum)

  • by isolating the virus in the cell culture 
  • using molecular-biological methods (PCR) 
  • by finding evidence of antibodies using a serum neutralisation test (SNT) 
  • by TGE/PRCV -  AB Differentiation ELISA
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