Amoebiasis

Malpighamoeba mellificae

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Changed on: 23.01.2019
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The Malpighamoeba infests the urinal tract of adult bees, thus, triggering amoebiasis.

The amoeba Malpighamoeba mellificae PRELL is a member of the protozoa and is found in the digestive tract of the honey bee (Malpighian tubules). This disease takes on dormant forms, so-called cysts, which can survive for a longer period of time outside the bee, in addition to its reproductive form (amoeboid state).

Amoebiasis often occurs as a mixed infection together with nosemosis.


The Malpighamoeba infests the urinal tract of adult bees, thus, triggering amoebiasis.

The amoeba Malpighamoeba mellificae PRELL is a member of the protozoa and is found in the digestive tract of the honey bee (Malpighian tubules). This disease takes on dormant forms, so-called cysts, which can survive for a longer period of time outside the bee, in addition to its reproductive form (amoeboid state).

Amoebiasis often occurs as a mixed infection together with nosemosis.


Symptoms

Typical symptoms include very liquid, golden-yellow, nauseating excrement.

General symptoms include heavy diarrhoea, crawler bees, bees incapable of flying with trembling wings, bloated abdomens, excrement all over the combs, hives and bottom boards, as well as an increased number of dead bees.

Factors such as extended non-swarming periods, severe disturbance, no queen, cold weather, cool and wet summer and autumn months and long winters help this disease spread.

Transmission

The disease is transmitted by passing on cysts via excrement to cleaning workers as they clean the hive and from colony to colony (bees returning to the wrong hive, robbery, bee watering stations).

The disease could also be transmitted by the beekeeper (moving cyst-infested combs, putting infected colonies together with healthy colonies).

 

 

Combating Amoebiasis

Hygiene

Self-restoration possible in cases with weak infestations.

Assist the turnover of bees, to make older bees leave quicker. 

Kill weak colonies that are heavily infested.

In the case of a light infestation, remove combs filled with excrement from the colony, remove dead bees from the bottom, clean the bottom and front boards.

Reduce the colony’s space in the hive.

Provide enough food supplies.

There is no approved drug to deal this disease in Austria.


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