Nanovirus

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Changed on: 04.05.2017
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Ackerbohnenpflanze mit Nanoviren infiziert
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© AGES/Grausgruber-Gröger: Ackerbohnenpflanze mit Nanoviren infiziert

Nanoviridae are tiny, single-stranded DNA viruses compared to other phytopathogenic viruses. Until recently, these viruses have mainly been a problem in various legumes, such as lentils or chickpeas, in warmer regions, such as North and East Africa, the Middle East, Asia and Australia. However, viruses of the nanovirus group were detected in peas in Germany for the first time in 2009 and in Austria in 2010.

More information
Ackerbohnenpflanze mit Nanoviren infiziert
caption
© AGES/Grausgruber-Gröger: Ackerbohnenpflanze mit Nanoviren infiziert

Nanoviridae are tiny, single-stranded DNA viruses compared to other phytopathogenic viruses. Until recently, these viruses have mainly been a problem in various legumes, such as lentils or chickpeas, in warmer regions, such as North and East Africa, the Middle East, Asia and Australia. However, viruses of the nanovirus group were detected in peas in Germany for the first time in 2009 and in Austria in 2010.

More information

Symptoms

Symptoms

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Typical field bean stock 2016: a high percentage of plants show symptoms caused by a nanovirus; Field bean stock 2016
Typischer Ackerbohnenbestand 2016: ein hoher Prozentsatz der Pflanzen zeigt Nanovirensymptome

An early nanovirus infestation manifests in shrunken plants with reduced root and nodule formation. The leaves are often yellowed and partly curled and the tips of the shoots may die.
The base of the pods is short and the seeds do not fully ripen. In filed beans, affected plants can still reach their normal height and pod base, but they will be very chlorotic, appearing almost white.

Early infections may result in reduced harvest yields or even complete loss of harvests.

 

 

Transmission

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Ackerbohnenbestand 2016
Ackerbohnenbestand 2016

Nanoviruses are transmitted via vectors. The pea aphid and the black bean aphid are the most important vectors. Nanoviruses cannot be transmitted mechanically or via seeds (Ziebell and Friedrich, 2014).
Host plants for nanoviruses include primarily legumes, such as peas, field beans, various clover species, vetches and lentils. Nanovirus species from warmer regions may also affect soya beans, but this has not yet been confirmed for species found in Central Europe (Ziebell and Friedrich, 2014).

Ziebell, H., und Friedrich, N. (2014): Eine Gefahr für den Leguminosenanbau? Nanoviren sind auf dem Vormarsch. Der Pflanzenarzt 4/2014, 21-23.

Diagnosis

Diagnosis

Nanoviridae are detected in plants at AGES using molecular-biological methods. In addition, the species of nanovirus can also be determined using sequence analysis, if required. The analysis usually takes two working days (about four working days for sequence analysis).

Information on sample taking and analysis costs: https://www.ages.at/en/service/services-agriculture/plant-health/

Contact

Institut für Nachhaltige Pflanzenproduktion - Abteilung für molekularbiologische Analyse von Pflanzenkrankheiten
Phone: +43(0)5 0555 34200
Spargelfeldstraße 191
1220 Wien



Institut für Nachhaltige Pflanzenproduktion - Abteilung für molekularbiologische Analyse von Pflanzenkrankheiten
Phone: +43(0)5 0555 34200
Spargelfeldstraße 191
1220 Wien



Control

Control

There is no curative treatment for plants that are already infected by nanoviruses. The only possibility to combat the disease is the prophylactic control of aphids. It also seems sensible to grow early varieties to reduce symptoms.

The fact that legumes, such as field beans, vetches etc., are used as green manure and cover crops for the winter, suggests that their role as a virus reservoir for succeeding plants must be taken into consideration.

 

 

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