Plant Health

Services Warndienst Pflanzengesundheit
Changed on: 03.11.2017
Apfelwickler_Raupe im Kerngehäuse

The production of healthy plants is essential for the manufacturing of high-quality foods. The Institute for Sustainable Plant Production addresses a variety of issues relating to plant health maintenance.

The institute creates the conditions necessary for prophylactic plant health assurance by protecting Austrian plant production from the introduction and spread of dangerous quarantine pests (QP).

Apfelwickler_Raupe im Kerngehäuse

The production of healthy plants is essential for the manufacturing of high-quality foods. The Institute for Sustainable Plant Production addresses a variety of issues relating to plant health maintenance.

The institute creates the conditions necessary for prophylactic plant health assurance by protecting Austrian plant production from the introduction and spread of dangerous quarantine pests (QP).

Official Plant Protection Service

The risk of introducing pests into Europe and, subsequently, Austria has increased in the last two decades as a result of growth in global trade, rapid transportation systems and the effects of climate change. Laws at international (IPPC and European Union) and national (Plant Protection Act 2011) levels detail the measures put in place to counteract the introduction and spread of such quarantine pests.

The responsibilities of the Official Plant Protection Service (Amtlicher Pflanzenschutzdienst) comprises administrative and coordinating activities in phytosanitary control.

Further information on the Official Plant Protection Service can be found here.

 

 

Contact

Official Plant Protection Service
Phone: +43 5 0555 33301
Fax: +43 5 0555 33303
Spargelfeldstrasse 191
1220 Wien



Official Plant Protection Service
Phone: +43 5 0555 33301
Fax: +43 5 0555 33303
Spargelfeldstrasse 191
1220 Wien



QSO

Quarantäneschadorganismen (QSO) sind Organismen mit potentieller Schadwirkung auf Pflanzen in gefährdeten Gebieten, in denen sie bisher noch nicht auftreten oder dort nicht weit verbreitet sind.

Es können Organismen aller Arten, Stämme oder Biotypen von Pflanzen, Tieren oder Krankheitserregern (Bakterien, Pilze oder Viren) sein, die an Pflanzen große wirtschaftliche Schäden anrichten.

Durch deren Einschleppung über den Handel und Verkehr und die Verbreitung stellen sie ein hohes Risiko für unsere Land- und Forstwirtschaft dar.

Das Verbringen von Quarantäneschadorganismen ist verboten und sie dürfen weder auf Pflanzen und pflanzlichen Produkten, noch auf sonstigen Gegenständen (z.B. Verpackungen) eingeschleppt werden. Ihre Ausbreitung ist mit geeigneten amtlichen Maßnahmen zu bekämpfen.

Das Auftreten von Quarantäneschadorganismen ist beim Amtlichen Pflanzenschutzdienst des betreffenden Bundeslandes meldepflichtig (Kontakte APSD Länder).

Rechtliche Grundlagen hierzu sind das Pflanzenschutzgesetz 2011 idgF., das Pflanzgutgesetz 1997 idgF. und ggf. das Saatgutgesetz 1997 idgF.

Der Amtliche Pflanzenschutzdienst koordiniert österreichweit die Angelegenheiten im Bereich QSO.

Das Institut für Nachhaltige Pflanzenproduktion ist nationales Referenzlabor für pflanzliche Quarantäneschadorganismen in Österreich mit hoher Kompetenz in

  • Identifikation und Diagnostik von Quarantäneschaderregern mit anerkannten und akkreditierten Methoden gemäß ISO 17025 (z. B.:  Feuerbrand, u.v.a.)
  • Forschung auf dem Gebiet phytosanitär regulierter und nicht regulierter QSO und anderer Schaderreger (z. B. Maiswurzelbohrer)
  • EU-Monitorings gemäß EU-Richtlinien und EU-Entscheidungen
  • Invasive Pflanzen
  • Pest-Risiko-Analyse-Studien 

Umfangreiche Referenzsammlungen tierischer und pflanzlicher Schadorganismen ergänzen die Diagnostik.

Das Institut für Nachhaltige Pflanzenproduktion ist amtlich anerkannte Versuchseinrichtung für Labor-, Glashaus- und Freilandtestungen von Pflanzenschutzmitteln.

Invasive Plants

The discovery of the New World in 1492 marked a turning point in agriculture. Exotic plants (neophytes) were able to overcome bio-geographical borders with the help of humans making their way to Europe (and vice versa to America). The conscious importing of plants was and still is the most common way to bring exotic plants to Europe, mostly for economic reasons: new species for agriculture, forestry, parks or fish tanks. At present, rapidly growth in global trade and transportation is a major contributor to the inadvertent introduction of non-indigenous species, in addition to species that are imported consciously.

Quick search "Invasive plants" in the AGES pest database

Ecological, economic and health-related effects

The vast majority of exotic plants integrate into the local flora without any problems. However, some species can cause considerable damage in their new habitat. These plants can repress indigenous species and change the structure and function of ecological systems in the  long-term. These non-indigenous plants -- also referred to as “invasive” plants -- are considered the second largest threat to biological diversity at present. Moreover, such non-indigenous plants may cause considerable commercial damage -- e.g. in agriculture -- or pose a threat to human health.

Situation in Austria

There are currently about 1,100 non-indigenous plant species in Austria. Approximately one fifth of these species has been able to gain a permanent foothold in the wild. At present, 17 species are classified as invasive from an environmental perspective. These include the tree of heaven (ailanthus altissima) and the black locust or false acacia (robinia pseudoacacia). A further 18 species are considered potentially invasive and are likely to cause ecological problems should they continue to spread. Invasive, non-indigenous plants mostly invade habitats such as wetlands, tall forb meadows and the dry locations of the Pannonian region.

Blüten vom Götterbaum

While the occurrence of the tree of heaven is more of a nuisance than a problem in urban areas, it is alarming that this tree could invade the wetlands along the Danube River in the warm-summered east.

New invasive weed species in agriculture

There are several problematic species in agriculture, too. Some of them have become a permanent part of the local weed flora over the decades, while others have arrived more recently. One example of an “established” weed species is the red-root amaranth or common tumbleweed (Amaranthus retroflexus). This plant originated in the central and eastern regions of the USA and in northeast Mexico. It is believed that LINNAEUS introduced this species in around 1750 to cultivate it at the botanical garden in Uppsala. In western Europe, this species first occurred subspontaneously in Paris in 1783 and spread rapidly over wide areas of Europe and to Austria from about 1800 onwards. On the other hand, the appearance of new, often warmth-loving weeds has been observed to an increasing degree in agriculture. Such plants include nut grass (Cyperus esculentus), goosegrass (Eleusine indica), velvet weed (Abutilon theophrasti) and the Apple of Peru (Nicandra physalodes).

Erdmandelgras Bluete

Introduced via building machines – nut grass

The plant is found in many agricultural cultures and is very difficult to control.

 

 

Globalisation and Climate Change

It is a fact that new species will be added to the current list on an ongoing basis. There are many reasons for this: introduction via contaminated seed material, traded goods and vehicles, or ornamental plants that have spread into the wild. Another cause not to be underestimated is climate change. It facilitates the appearance of new weed species that are indigenous to the meridional-subtropical regions in Austria. However, many long established, warmth-loving species that are currently only found in specific regions in Austria will also benefit, such as the common ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia), for instance. This plant is currently limited to Austria’s warmer lowlands. A more rapid spread of this species into other areas of Austria is expected as a result of climate change.

Further information, fact sheets and databases on invasive, non-indigenous plants in Austria and Europe

Research

Overview Research Projects

Predicting overwintering survival and establishment of exotic pest insects under future Austrian climatic conditions
Forschungsprojekt, Klimafonds
AGES-Contact: Dr. Andreas Kahrer
 Project duration: 01.07.2011 – 30.06.2014 

Modelling epidemiological and economic consequences of Grapevine Flavescence Dorée phytoplasma to Austrian viticulture under a climate  change scenario
Forschungsprojekt, Klimafonds
AGES-Contact: DI Robert Steffek
 Project duration: 01.03.2011 – 28.02.2013

Climate change induced invasion and socio-economic impacts of allergy-inducing plants in Austria
Forschungsprojekt, Klimafonds
AGES-Contact: Dr. Swen Follak
 Project duration: 01.01.2011 – 31.12.2012 

EUPHRESCO II- ERA-NET:
Coordination of European Phytosanitary (statutory plant health) Research

7. EU Forschungsrahmenprogramm
AGES-Contact: Univ. Doz. DI Dr. Sylvia Blümel
 Project duration: 03.01.2011 – 03.01.2014
www.euphresco.org

EFSA: 
Risk assessment for the European Community plant health: A comparative approach with case studies
EFSA Projekt
AGES-Contact: DI Robert Steffek
Project duration: 01.04.2010 – 01.08.2012
AGES Kooperation mit der EFSA

Risk Management for the EC listed Anoplophora species, A. chinensis and A. glabripennis (ANOPLORISK) (EUPHRESCO-Projekt)
AGES-Contact:  Dr. Christa Lethmayer
Project duration: 15.12.2010 – 15.12.2012
http:// www.dafne.at

GIS data base and methodology for estimating impacts of climate change on soil temperatures and related risks for Austrian agriculture
Forschungsprojekt, FFG, Klimafonds
AGES-Ansprechpartner: Mag. Dr. Giselher Grabenweger
Project duration: 01.01.2010 – 01.12.2012 

Langzeit-Monitoring der Auswirkungen einer Umstellung auf den biologischen Landbau (MUBIL III)
Forschungsprojekt, DAFNE
AGES-Contact: Ing. Martin Plank
Project duration: 28.09.2009 – 30.09.2011 
http:// www.dafne.at

Optimierung der Wirkung von Bodeninsektiziden und der Saatgutbehandlung zur Verbesserung der Managementstrategie gegen den Quarantäneschädling Diabrotica virgifera virgifera
Forschungsprojekt, JKI - DE
AGES-Contact: Mag. Dr. Giselher Grabenweger
Project duration: 01.04.2009 – 30.11.2011 

Labor- und Feldversuche zur nachhaltigen Bekämpfung von Adultstadien zur Verbesserung der Managementstrategie gegen den Quarantäneschädling Diabrotica virgifera virgifera
Forschungsprojekt, JKI - DE
AGES-Contact: Mag. Dr. Giselher Grabenweger
Project duration: 01.04.2009 – 30.11.2011 

Erforschung alternativer Strategien zur langfristigen Eindämmung von Feuerbrand ohne Antibiotika im Obstbau (ANTEA)
Forschungsprojekt Nr. 100448 BMLFUW, DAFNE
AGES-Contact: Dr. Doris Greilinger
Project duration: 23.12.2008 – 15.12.2011
http:// www.dafne.at

Interreg IV „Gemeinsam gegen Feuerbrand“: Methoden zur Bekämpfung von Feuerbrand – Sichtung, Forschung und begleitende Kommunikation
AGES-Contact: DI Ulrike Persen
Project duration: 01.10.2007 – 31.12.2011

Implementation of Integrated Border Management Serbia
Twinning-Number: SR 06 IB JH 01

AGES-Contact: Ing. Elisabeth Jägersberger
 Project duration: 01.09.2009 – 01.02.2011  

EUPHRESCO I - ERA-NET:
Coordination of European Phytosanitary (statutory plant health) Research

6. EU Forschungsrahmenprogramm
AGES-Contact: Univ. Doz. DI Dr. Sylvia Blümel
 Project duration: 02.05.2006 – 01.09.2010
www.euphresco.org

Untersuchungen ausgewählter Parameter im Hinblick auf die Verbesserung der Möglichkeiten zur Vorbeugung und Bekämpfung von Feuerbrand
Forschungsprojekt Nr. 100060 BMLFUW, DAFNE
AGES-Contact: DI Ulrike Persen
 Project duration: 01.09.2006 – 31.03.2009
http:// www.dafne.at  

Aufklärung der biochemischen und molekularbiologischen Grundlagen der Feuerbrandresistenz
Forschungsprojekt Nr. 100049 BMLFUW, DAFNE
AGES-Contact: DI Ulrike Persen
 Project duration: 01.12.2007 – 31.12.2009
http:// www.dafne.at

EUPHRESCO Pilot Project:
Detection and Epidemiology of Pospiviroids (DEP)

AGES-Contact: Mag. Dr. Richard Gottsberger
 Project duration: 01.10.2008 – 30.09.2009 

EUPHRESCO Pilot Project:
Development and validation of innovative diagnostic tools for the detection of fire blight (Erwinia amylovora)(ERWINDECT)

AGES-Contact: Mag. Helga Reisenzein
 Project duration: 01.10.2008 – 30.09.2009 

EUPHRESCO Pilot Project:
Ring test on diagnostic methods for Erwinia stewartii ssp.stewartii (Pantoea stewartii ssp. stewartii)

AGES-Contact: Univ. Doz. Dr. Gerhard Bedlan
 Project duration: 01.10.2008 – 30.09.2009

EUPHRESCO Pilot Project:
Potato cyst nematodes: ring testing methods for identification and resistance testing

AGES-Contact: Ines Gabl
 Project duration: 01.10.2008 – 30.09.2009 

Entwicklung verschiedener Strategien zur Lösung von Problemen mit bodenbürtigen Schaderregern im Gartenbau am Beispiel der Modellkultur Erdbeere
Forschungsprojekt Nr. 100042 BMLFUW, DAFNE
AGES-Contact: DI Robert Steffek
 Project duration: 01.07.2006 – 30.06.2009  

Nachhaltige Regulation von Schaderregern im  biologischen Anbau von ausgewählten  Körnerleguminosen
Forschungsprojekt Nr. 1395/2 BMLFUW, DAFNE
AGES- Contact: Dr. Christa Lethmayer
 Project duration: 01.03.2006 – 30.11.2009

Auswirkung von handelsbedingten Transportwegen und Lagerzeiten auf die biologische Fitness von Encarsia formosa und Phytoseiulus persimilis unterschiedlicher Produktionsherkunft
Forschungsprojekt Nr. 100050 BMLFUW,DAFNE
AGES-Contact: Dr. Sylvia Blümel
 Project duration: 02.10.2006 – 30.09.2008

Duftöl statt Nervengift – Schutz vor Milliarden-Dollar-Käfer durch innovativen Pheromoneinsatz
Forschungsprojekt Nr. 812176/11217 SCK/SAI
AGES-Contact: Dr. Andreas Kahrer
 Project duration: 01.02.2006 – 31.10.2006

Untersuchungen zur Bedeutung, geographischen Verbreitung und Epidemiologie von Phytoplasmosen im österreichischen Weinbau
Forschungsprojekt Nr. 1389 BMLFUW, DAFNE
AGES-Contact: Mag. Helga Reisenzein 
Project duration: 01.01.2005 – 31.05.2007 

Abschätzung des Risikos einer dauerhafte Festsetzung von Gewächshausschädlingen im Freiland als Folge des Klimawandels am Beispiel des Kalifornischen Blütenthripses (Frankliniella occidentalis)      
StartClim2005
AGES-Contact: Dr. Andreas Kahrer
 Project duration: 01.01.2006 - 31.10.2006

Risikoabschätzung und Strategien zur Bekämpfung von Feuerbrand (Erwinia amylovora)
Forschungsprojekt Nr. 1404 BMLFUW DAFNE
AGES-Contact: Dr. Rudolf Moosbeckhofer (Institut für Bienenkunde)
 Project duration: 01.03.2004 – 31.08.2006 

Wissenschaftliche Betreuung

Dissertationen

Möglichkeiten der biologischen Bekämpfung von Metcalfa pruinosa (Say 1830; Hemiptera, Flatidae) einer nach Österreich eingeschleppten, schädlichen Zikade
AGES-Ansprechpartner: Univ. Doz. DI Dr. Sylvia Blümel

 

 

Diplom-/Masterarbeiten


Abgeschlossene Diplom-/Masterarbeiten/Dissertationen

Untersuchungen zu Cacopsylla melanoneura als potentieller Vektor und Crataegus sp. als potentielle Wirtspflanze von 'Candidatus Phytoplasma pyri'
AGES-Ansprechpartner: Univ. Doz. DI Dr. Sylvia Blümel

aleph22-prod-uni.obvsg.at/F

Vorkommen und Bedeutung von Eiprädatoren als natürliche Feinde des Maiswurzelbohrers (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera L.) in den östlichen Maisanbaugebieten Österreichs   AGES-Ansprechpartner: Univ. Doz. DI Dr. Sylvia Blümel

aleph22-prod-uni.obvsg.at/F

Dorn, Martin: Untersuchungen zur Nahrungseignung ausgewählter Pflanzen aus Winterweizenfeldern für Junglarven der Getreidewanze (Eurygaster maura L.)
AGES-Ansprechpartner: Univ. Doz. DI Dr. Sylvia Blümel

Weilner, Sandra: Nachweis von Iris Yellow Spot Virus an ausgewählten Allium-Arten und dessen Überwinterungswirten in österreichischen Anbaugebieten
AGES-Ansprechpartner: Univ.-Doz. Dr. Gerhard Bedlan 
zidapps.boku.ac.at/abstracts/oe_list.php

Ljubica Petrina: Untersuchungen zur Verbesserung des Nachweises von Clavibacter michiganensis ssp. michiganensis an Tomaten-Jungpflanzen
AGES-Ansprechpartner: Univ.-Doz. Dr. Gerhard Bedlan
zidapps.boku.ac.at/abstracts/oe_list.php

Leichtfried, Thomas: Qualitativer und quantitativer Nachweis von Erwinia amylovora an Bienen mit molekulargenetischen Methoden
AGES-Ansprechpartner: Univ. Doz. DI Dr. Sylvia Blümel
zidapps.boku.ac.at/abstracts/oe_list.php

Egartner, Alois: Erste Erhebungen zum Vorkommen der amerikanischen Kirschfruchtfliegenarten Rhagoletis cingulata loew und R. indifferens curran (Diptera: Tephritidae) in Österreich
AGES-Ansprechpartner: Univ. Doz. DI Dr. Sylvia Blümel
zidapps.boku.ac.at/abstracts/oe_list.php

x