AGES Risk Atlas

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Changed on: 30.05.2016

The first item in the AGES publication series “AGES Wissen aktuell” to appear is the AGES Risk Atlas.

The issues to be addressed need to be organised systematically and prioritised well, given the plethora of diverse topics in the human-plant-soil cycle. One way to achieve this is by using risk maps. Setting up a risk atlas as a collection of risk maps is a dynamic process that represents the current situation as of December 2014. The atlas is expanded through the successive addition of further maps and updated by adapting existing maps on a regular basis.

AGES uses a risk-based, integrated approach to create risk maps. This approach differentiates between hazard carriers and risk carriers and takes into account how hazards can spread via the soil-plant-animal-food-human impact chain. The idea behind this approach is to establish a separate risk map for each combination of hazard carriers and risk carriers.

This AGES risk-based, integrated-approach model and the strategic consideration of the use of AGES risk maps is described in the section on methods and approaches. This section also includes definitions and the general process to be considered when creating a risk map. The risk maps are at the core of our risk atlas, providing a succinct overview of the individual risk topics. 

The risk atlas is directed primarily at the three major AGES target groups: governmental agencies, companies/economic agents and multipliers. Individuals involved in the assessment, management and communication of health risks to humans, animals and plants can use the risk atlas as a tool to plan strategic initiatives and actions in organising control measures, research, resource planning and communications. The risk atlas also provides information on the risk situation in Austria from the AGES perspective.

The first item in the AGES publication series “AGES Wissen aktuell” to appear is the AGES Risk Atlas.

The issues to be addressed need to be organised systematically and prioritised well, given the plethora of diverse topics in the human-plant-soil cycle. One way to achieve this is by using risk maps. Setting up a risk atlas as a collection of risk maps is a dynamic process that represents the current situation as of December 2014. The atlas is expanded through the successive addition of further maps and updated by adapting existing maps on a regular basis.

AGES uses a risk-based, integrated approach to create risk maps. This approach differentiates between hazard carriers and risk carriers and takes into account how hazards can spread via the soil-plant-animal-food-human impact chain. The idea behind this approach is to establish a separate risk map for each combination of hazard carriers and risk carriers.

This AGES risk-based, integrated-approach model and the strategic consideration of the use of AGES risk maps is described in the section on methods and approaches. This section also includes definitions and the general process to be considered when creating a risk map. The risk maps are at the core of our risk atlas, providing a succinct overview of the individual risk topics. 

The risk atlas is directed primarily at the three major AGES target groups: governmental agencies, companies/economic agents and multipliers. Individuals involved in the assessment, management and communication of health risks to humans, animals and plants can use the risk atlas as a tool to plan strategic initiatives and actions in organising control measures, research, resource planning and communications. The risk atlas also provides information on the risk situation in Austria from the AGES perspective.


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